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Bloomberg: Angeloska Bezhoska one of just four women who run central banks in Europe

The New York-based business news agency Bloomberg published an article on governor Anita Angelovska Bezhoska describing her macroeconomic stability plans as well as challenges she faces as a woman in a patriarchal society.

Skopje, 22 March 2019 (MIA) – The New York-based business news agency Bloomberg published an article on governor Anita Angelovska Bezhoska describing her macroeconomic stability plans as well as challenges she faces as a woman in a patriarchal society.

The 47-year-old economist who has three kids, the article reads, almost turned down the job offer to be governor.

Angeloska Bezhoska was initially worried she’d struggle to balance the responsibilities of the position with her family life.

Now, she is successfully directing financial policy in North Macedonia, where one in five adults is unemployed, Bloomberg writes.

According to the article, political crisis pushed the country’s economic growth to the brink of recession two years ago.

But the nation resolved a decades-long dispute over its name and opened the path to membership in NATO and the EU.

“While EU membership is years away, Bezhoska is already looking at how North Macedonia can adopt the euro.

“With a de-facto peg against the single currency, and with debt and inflation levels within EU targets, it meets most formal requirements,” Bloomberg writes about the governor and her initial preparations for euro adoption.

Accepting the responsibility for the nation’s macroeconomic stability despite it being “not an easy task,” Angeloska Bezhoska told Bloomberg that adopting the euro is a natural end-point, considering the country already has financial and trade ties to the EU.

Angeloska Bezhoska has previously worked for the International Monetary Fund, where she participated in Balkan and Baltic missions.

Bloomberg also points out she’s one of only four females in Europe to run a monetary authority.

The other three European women running their countries’ central banks are in Cyprus, Serbia, and Russia.

Angeloska Bezhoska’s success is an exception, Bloomberg writes, in a nation where most top jobs are still given to men.

But she’s trying to change this: about 60 percent of the central bank’s management are now women, including two vice governors she has appointed. mr/13:17

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